Korean Groups Announced Opposition to AB918

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Assemblywoman said, “AB 918 enables acupuncturists to save resources, and enhance portability of their licensure across the nation for greater employment opportunities.”

Namwook Cho L.Ac.

Most Korean acupuncture groups and associations have shown their opposition to the bill Assembly Bill (AB) 918 (Acupuncture Licensure) introduced by Assemblywoman Quirk-Silva (65th District, D).

Acupuncture Times has surveyed five major Korean stakeholders such as Asian American Acupuncture Association (AAAA), Association of Korean Asian Medicine and Acupuncture of California (AKAMAC), Korean Acupuncture and Asian Medicine Association (KAAMA), American Acupuncture and Alternative Medicine Association (AAAMA), and American Integrative Medicine Institute (AIMI). And South Baylo University and Dongguk University Los Angeles, DULA, also expressed their opposing position to the newspaper company.

Majority Korean Stakeholders saying “Qualification standard for taking CALE and NCCAOM are not equivalent

Assemblywoman Quirk-Silva, “we will continue to have stakeholder meetings and reach a resolution

The majority opposed AB 918 because of different qualifying standards for taking California Acupuncture Licensing Examination (CALE) and National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM). Others are concerned about surging license renewal fees. Currently, acupuncturists who have acupuncture licenses issued by California Acupuncture Board (CAB) only pay the CAB renewal fee. After NCCAOM replacing CALE, acupuncturists have to renew their NCCAOM certification first in order to renew their biannual California acupuncturist license.

The Acupuncture Times had an email interview with Assemblywoman Quirk-Silva regarding the Korean community’s concerns.

Assemblywoman Quirk-Silva explained, “The bill will allow a prospective acupuncturist to take the national examination to qualify for national certification and California state licensure enabling acupuncturists to take one exam, save resources, and secure enhanced portability of their licensure across the nation for greater employment opportunities.”

Assemblywoman continued, “With AB 918, it was not my intent to change any of the California educational and training requirements students must meet to sit for the licensure exam, but instead provide more options for students that are considering this practice. Now that this is a two-year bill, it is my hope that we will continue to have stakeholder meetings and reach a resolution on the differing points of view.”

The Assemblywoman stressed the benefits from amending current CAB’s Rules and Regulation regarding CALE saying, “AB 918 allows future California license applicants to sit for the updated NCCAOM exam, instead of the CALE. This bill would allow a prospective acupuncturist to take the national examination to qualify for national certification and California state licensure, enabling acupuncturists to take one exam, save resources, and secure enhanced portability of their licensure across the nation for greater employment opportunities.”

According to the Bill, the benefits of national certification include allowing acupuncturists throughout the country to qualify for providing board-certified services in Medicare and Veterans Administration programs. Additionally, many hospitals, insurance companies, and employers already require NCCAOM as a condition for employment.

Currently, the bill is under California State Assembly Committee on Business and Professions and will be active until 2022.

 

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